Interview techniques

Having spent the last few months looking at opportunities in the market place, I am getting familiar with the tactics used by organisations to “streamline” the process. The last time I was looking for work was sixteen years ago when LinkedIn had just started to be a thing and the reliance was on searching print media for job openings as well as some of the bigger online recruiters. Most insisted on a face to face interview to discuss your cv, your job ambitions and what potential openings they had.

Today, it has all changed. It is now very easy for a company to post a position online, create an automated process and quickly create short-lists based on algorithms, AI and automation. The consequence is that far more applicants are applying for each job listed, because the odds of making a short-list have been significantly reduced as the filtering based on a cv or a LinkedIn profile can be done by computers in seconds. Consequently, with in many instances the human element in the initial job search being removed, more applicants apply, creating a catch 22 situation.

In the excitement to find an interesting role that ticks as many boxes as it can, we are often prepared to give away more personal information than is often needed. But we do so because the prize is so worthwhile. Except, what if there isn’t a job? What if the ad posted online is simply an elaborate phishing scheme to get candidates to share personal data that could be used for their financial gain?

Employment/Recruitment scams are nothing new. They have been with us for many years and have cost some victims thousands of pounds. There have been cases of individuals selling up and moving their families to a new country because they have a new role only to find on day one that there was never a job and the fees they paid to sort out visas or short-term accommodation have been pocketed by fraudsters. But the acceptance of our digital lives today has led us to be less cautious when it comes to giving out personal details.

It would take a fraudster a matter of minutes to create a fake company profile on Social Media, adding in a few exotic office locations, a fictitious management team and of course, some interesting open vacancies as the company looks to expand into new markets. Applicants for the roles need to submit CVs, a cover letter and complete a suitability questionnaire, all designed to glean information that could be resold on, or used by the fraudsters themselves to lure the candidate deeper into their web of lies.

Sounds far fetched? Well, have a read of this article, written by security expert Brian Krebs who reports on just this type of scam taking place a few weeks ago. This is just one example of a practice that is still far too common, especially as it looks to exploit those who may be in desperate need of employment. We need to take as many cautionary steps when seeking a new role as we do when buying from an unknown online store, or responding to a dubious text or WhatsApp message, and be especially wary if the firm approaches you cold, with an amazing offer of employment.

It doesn’t take much to determine whether a job opening is real or not. Whilst many of us will use LinkedIn or popular job sites such as Indeed, most firms will also list the roles on their own websites. So a starting point is to check to see if the role exists there. Still unsure about the company? When did they register their domain name – if it appears very recent and through a proxy registration that should be a red flag. Look at their address on an online map – does it appear to be real? When you search for the address, what companies are listed? Use tools such as Glassdoor to check on what current and former employees say about the business. Also, search for key individuals on LinkedIn – do they appear to be genuine?

The global economy is still in a state of flux and with economic support for many firms slowly being reduced, the employment market is likely to hot up again. A major “supply” of available people will ultimately increase the demand on vacant positions, and the one thing we know from the world of the fraudsters is when demand increases, so too does fraud.