It’s coming home…but is it real?

After 18 months of restrictions, regulations and down right misery for many in England, the performance of the England National Football Team in the European Championships has been a source of escapism for many and downright joy and national pride for the rest. In case you didn’t already know, It’s coming home* this week. Should England overcome Denmark at Wembley on Wednesday night they will face a final in London on Sunday night against either Italy, the favourites, and previous winners, Spain. It’s a tough ask, but the team under the management of Gareth Southgate, has given the nation hope at a time when it was seriously lacking. Good times indeed. But good times also bring bad people out in force, looking to exploit the situation and profit from the opportunity.

The interest and support for the England team has led to unprecedented demand both for tickets for games to see them play at Wembley and for replica shirts. Prior to the tournament, an official Nike England shirt (adult size) would cost a minimum of £70, and there was stock with most of the online retailers. Three weeks later and it is almost impossible to find one in the same stores.

That is excellent news for Nike, the manufacturer, the retailers and also the Football Association who will also get a cut from each sale. But it is also excellent news for the scammers and counterfeiters who will play on that increased demand and limited supply to fill the vacuum. There have been adverts on social media in recent weeks, carefully designed to say they aren’t selling the actual Nike replica shirts, but using language and imagery that suggests they are. Many of these stores will be genuine, but the products not what people are expecting. But there will also be online retailers who are offering what appears to be the genuine items but nothing will ever arrive – they have been scammed out of personal and financial information. That is hardly a feel-good moment. Unfortunately, it doesn’t take much searching to find websites selling the shirts at what appears to be too good to be true pricing (search “cheap England replica shirt” and see for yourself), whilst a search on some of the more popular market place websites review very cheap products, but using imagery from the back which means the images avoid detection from brand recognition software and also allows the sellers to ship low quality goods.

The cheap and often infringing merchandise situation is nothing new. In the US, Operation Team Player is the annual crackdown on merchandise around the Super Bowl. In the days leading up to the last Super Bowl in Tampa in February 2021, over 169,000 counterfeit items, with a street value of $44 million were seized. The war on counterfeits continues, fuelled by rampant demand for products such as the replica shirts.

It isn’t only fake merchandise which will cause issues in the next week for football fans. Whilst the number of fans allowed into Wembley has increased as social distancing regulations have been relaxed, the 90,000 capacity stadium will not be full, which means tickets will be at an extra premium. The face value price for tickets for the Final on Sunday range from £250 to approximately £815. Ticket resale websites are selling them from £1,800 per ticket up to £15,000.

If England do beat Denmark then demand for a place at Wembley for the team’s biggest game in over 50 years will be huge. The good news is that Covid-19 has meant that paper tickets have been replaced by e-tickets, which can be transferred securely via the UEFA App, so the sight of ticket touts/scalpers, on the way to the stadium with fistfuls of tickets is thankfully a thing of the past. However, like genuine buyers, they too have gone digital and will claim to be able to transfer tickets immediately to a willing buyer.

With entry on digital devices by QR Codes, the danger is that rather than tickets being sold, they are screenshots of a genuine ticket, sold multiple times, which can only be verified as genuine on arrival at the stadium and presentation of the QR code. If it has already been used, then access will be denied, meaning someone could have paid a huge sum for what appears to be a genuine ticket, only to find out at the last minute it is counterfeit.

Unfortunately, there is very little that can be done to stop this happening – should England lose to the Danes then that is one way whereby demand will fall very quickly, but even then tickets will be changing hands about face value for the final.

The message hasn’t changed – if something looks too good to be true it probably is, whether that is an England shirt for a big discount or tickets to the sold out final. Whilst we all want to play our part in supporting our nation in what could be our biggest and most successful week of football since 1966, we also need to be pragmatic enough not to be part of the problem fuelling intellectual property infringements and making the lives of the fraudsters easier and richer.

Enjoy the games and Come On England!

And yes, I do believe It’s Coming Home*

*It’s coming home is the opening line to a song, first released back in 1996 by Frank Skinner, David Baddiel and The Lightning Seeds for the 1996 European Championships held in England, and re-released two years later for the 1998 World Cup. Unfortunately, England didn’t manage to bring the trophy home on either occasion, nor at any subsequent tournament they have taken part in.

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